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Primary Aspergillus pneumonia Pt DSM Community acquired primary Aspergillus pneumonia. Two x-rays taken on 02/02/2010 then 05/03/2010 Pt DSM Community acquired primary Aspergillus pneumonia 05/03/2010, Pt DSM, Community acquired Aspergillus pneumonia 02/02/2010
Pt DSM Community acquired primary Aspergillus pneumonia 05/03/2010, Pt DSM, Community acquired Aspergillus pneumonia 02/02/2010 Primary Aspergillus pneumonia Pt DSM Community acquired primary Aspergillus pneumonia. Two x-rays taken on 02/02/2010 then 05/03/2010
Community acquired Aspergillus pneumonia July 2011 primary Aspergillus pneumonia (Pt LG)
MFIG launch Sept 2015: Dr Mike Bromley (Principle Investigator) Mike Bromley
MFIG launch Sept 2015: Dr Paul Bowyer (Principle Investigator) Paul Bowyer
MFIG launch Sept 2015: Dr Elaine Bignell (Deputy Director)
MFIG launch Sept 2014: Sir Robert Boyd, Prof Keith Gull, Prof Nick Read, Director MFIG Sir Robert Boyd,  Prof Keith Gull,  Prof Nick Read
MFIG launch Sept 2015: Sir Robert Boyd, Prof Keith Gull and Prof Nick Read Sir Robert Boyd, Prof Keith Gull and Prof Nick Read
Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis complicating Caplan’s syndrome Mr RM is 80 and an ex-coal miner.He developed pneumoconiosis from exposure to coal dust. He also developed rheumatoid arthritis and the combination of this disease and pneumoconiosis is called Caplan’s syndrome.His chest Xray in early 2015 shows read more... June 2014 image 1, June 2014 image 2, June 2014 image 3, June 2014 image 4, June 2014 image 5, June 2014 image 6, January 2014
June 2014 image 1, June 2014 image 2, June 2014 image 3, June 2014 image 4, June 2014 image 5, June 2014 image 6, January 2014 Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis complicating Caplan’s syndrome Mr RM is 80 and an ex-coal miner.He developed pneumoconiosis from exposure to coal dust. He also developed rheumatoid arthritis and the combination of this disease and pneumoconiosis is called Caplan’s syndrome.His chest Xray in early 2015 shows read more...
Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging. (2)
Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging. (2)

(A) Anteroposterior radiograph of the right hip and (B) anteroposterior radiograph of the left hip demonstrate multifocal areas of irregular, dense and fluffy periostitis (black arrows) spanning the femoral necks to proximal shafts in both hips.

Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging. (1)
Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging. (1)

(A) Axial T2-weighted turbo spin echo fat-suppressed and (B) coronal STIR-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the hips demonstrate thick and irregular periosteal edema (white arrows) along the outer cortical surfaces of the bilateral proximal femoral shafts indicative of periostitis.

CT-guided needle biopsy
CT-guided needle biopsy

A radiologist may use a CT/MRI scanner to guide a hollow needle between the patient’s ribs to retrieve a tissue sample from the lung, which will then be examined under a microscope. This is less invasive than surgical biopsy, and will normally not require general anaesthesia.

In this picture, the patient is lying on their front with the needle going into their back to take a sample from the large inflammatory (whitish) area of the lung. Both lungs show considerable destruction of normal architecture, typical of emphysema, indicating that the patient was a heavy smoker.

Patients undergoing this procedure will receive local anaesthetic and sometimes other medication to relax them. They may need to avoid eating or taking certain medications (particularly blood thinners) some time before the procedure. The biopsy will generally take under an hour.

Read more at RadiologyInfo.org

Hickman Line
Hickman Line

Chest Xray showing the normal course of a Hickman line, usually used for delivering intravenous medication, and taking blood, in leukaemia patients. The line as shown is partly in the body and partly over the skin of the chest. The Hickman line is placed just below the clavicle (collar bone) on the patients right side (it can be on the left) into the subclavian vein. It is then fed through to the superior vena cava which drains blood from the upper body, head and neck into the heart. The end of the line lies in the superior vena cava about 6 inches (15 cm) above the heart (right atrium).

Percutaneous lung biopsy Percutaneous biopsy needle is seen vertically above the back Percutaneous biopsy needle is seen vertically above the back
Percutaneous biopsy needle is seen vertically above the back Percutaneous lung biopsy Percutaneous biopsy needle is seen vertically above the back

Under CT scan guidance, with the patient lying on their front, a percutaneous biopsy needle is seen vertically above the back, penetrating the skin, subcutaneous tissue and between 2 ribs. It is aimed at a an inflammatory area in the upper lobe of the lung, which defied diagnosis by other means. This area is much larger to access than the tiny nodule seen in in an identical location in the other lung. The lungs show considerable destruction of normal architecture, typical of emphysema with bullae, indicating that the patient was a heavy smoker.

Hickman line Chest Xray showing the normal course of a Hickman line Chest Xray showing the normal course of a Hickman line
Chest Xray showing the normal course of a Hickman line Hickman line Chest Xray showing the normal course of a Hickman line

Chest Xray showing the normal course of a Hickman line, usually used for delivering intravenous medication, and taking blood, in leukaemia patients. The line as shown is partly in the body and partly over the skin of the chest. The Hickman line is placed just below the clavicle (collar bone) on the patients right side (it can be on the left) into the subclavian vein. It is then fed through to the superior vena cava which drains blood from the upper body, head and neck into the heart. The end of the line lies in the superior vena cava about 6 inches (15 cm) above the heart (right atrium).

PtDS2 - Repeated chest infections halted by itraconazole in ABPA and bronchiectasis PtDS2 –Repeated chest infections arrested by itraconazole therapy in ABPA and bronchiectasisDS2 developed asthma age 24 and now aged 62. From about age 30 she started getting repeated chest infections and a few years later ABPA and bronchiectasis read more... Image A., Image B., Image C.
Image A., Image B., Image C. PtDS2 - Repeated chest infections halted by itraconazole in ABPA and bronchiectasis PtDS2 –Repeated chest infections arrested by itraconazole therapy in ABPA and bronchiectasisDS2 developed asthma age 24 and now aged 62. From about age 30 she started getting repeated chest infections and a few years later ABPA and bronchiectasis read more...

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