Species

To find your images: 1. Select the image group you want 2. If there are several images in the group another list will open - make a further selections in that list (NOTE holding down 'Control' key enables you to make multiple selections in each list) 3. Your selections will automatically load Note that there is a separate tab (above) that allows you to search images by keyword
Displaying 91 - 105 of 411
Drupal spam blocked by CleanTalk.
Title Legend Grouping
Kyphoscoliosis, left sided empyema The chest is distorted by a deformity of the back and ribs.
Kyphoscoliosis, left sided empyema The chest is distorted by a deformity of the back and ribs. This patient's X-ray is complex. The chest is distorted by a deformity of the back and ribs. Substantial metalwork following a spinal fusion is in place to support the vertebral column and part of this overlies the heart and part of it crosses the left lung. The patient also has a portacath device in-situ over the right lung, which allows i.v. antibiotics to be given. A needle is in-situ inside the portacath device. An external drainage tube is currently in-situ in a large air cavity and left upper thorax. This cavity contains mostly air but there is some fluid with the fluid level at its base. Underneath this large pyopneumothorax is a normal component of left lower lobe. The heart is very substantially moved to the right of the lung because of a previous right lower lobe resection. There is no evidence of aspergillosis on this x-ray as it stands.
Pt LA Preterm neonate with primary cutaneous aspergillosis, successful treatment with posaconazole. The patient was a 610 g twin male born by spontaneous normal vaginal delivery at 23 weeks and 4 days gestation. He was started on benzyl penicillin and gentamicin for sepsis. On day 3, he developed metabolic acidosis, hyponatremia, anemia, read more... Image A . Multiple circular papules with white eschars on the back., Image B. Wet mount microscopy of a skin scrape showing fungal fruiting head- suggestive of Aspergillus species
Image A . Multiple circular papules with white eschars on the back., Image B. Wet mount microscopy of a skin scrape showing fungal fruiting head- suggestive of Aspergillus species Pt LA Preterm neonate with primary cutaneous aspergillosis, successful treatment with posaconazole. The patient was a 610 g twin male born by spontaneous normal vaginal delivery at 23 weeks and 4 days gestation. He was started on benzyl penicillin and gentamicin for sepsis. On day 3, he developed metabolic acidosis, hyponatremia, anemia, read more...
Electron Microscopy: Aspergillus fumigatus Micrographs of A. fumigatus conidia & conidial heads provided by Amaliya Stepanova, , Head of Laboratory pathomorphology and cytology at Kashkin Research Institute, Russian Federation. Conidial head (SEM), Part of conidial head (SEM), Mature conidia (SEM), Hyphae (SEM), Murine lung tissue (TEM)
Conidial head (SEM), Part of conidial head (SEM), Mature conidia (SEM), Hyphae (SEM), Murine lung tissue (TEM) Electron Microscopy: Aspergillus fumigatus Micrographs of A. fumigatus conidia & conidial heads provided by Amaliya Stepanova, , Head of Laboratory pathomorphology and cytology at Kashkin Research Institute, Russian Federation.
Germinating spores of Aspergillus fumigatus Germinating spores of Aspergillus fumigatus
Germinating spores of Aspergillus fumigatus Germinating spores of Aspergillus fumigatus

Aspergillus spores are incredibly tiny, tough fungal seeds that germinate to form the germ tube and later hyphae. Germination is affected by temperature, humidity and pH among other factors.

About 3-4% of the population, including many asthma sufferers, are allergic to the proteins coating the surface of fungal spores. Levels of spores from most species peak during June-Sep, but aspergillus also peaks in Jan-Feb.

We all inhale hundreds of Aspergillus spores every day, but in healthy people they are cleared by white blood cells that engulf them before they have the chance to germinate. Stopping them from germinating is one potential way of preventing disease.

This picture shows a scanning electron micrograph of germinating Aspergillus fumigatus spores (provided by KM Lord and ND Read). In this picture the spores are clustered in the middle, with the germ tubes radiating outwards.

Read more and view the current spore level report

Aspergillus flavus: hand tissue. High power image (1000x) of Aspergillus flavus in hand tissue from a patient at Stanford University Medical Center (GMS stain). Aspergillus flavus: hand tissue. High power image (1000x) of Aspergillus flavus in hand tissue from a patient at Stanford University Medical Center (GMS stain).
Aspergillus flavus: hand tissue. High power image (1000x) of Aspergillus flavus in hand tissue from a patient at Stanford University Medical Center (GMS stain). Aspergillus flavus: hand tissue. High power image (1000x) of Aspergillus flavus in hand tissue from a patient at Stanford University Medical Center (GMS stain).
Aspergillus flavus: hand tissue. Image of Aspergillus flavus hyphae (400x) in hand tissue of same patient stained with Haemotoxylin eosin. Aspergillus flavus: hand tissue. Image of Aspergillus flavus hyphae (400x) in hand tissue of same patient stained with Haemotoxylin eosin.
Aspergillus flavus: hand tissue. Image of Aspergillus flavus hyphae (400x) in hand tissue of same patient stained with Haemotoxylin eosin. Aspergillus flavus: hand tissue. Image of Aspergillus flavus hyphae (400x) in hand tissue of same patient stained with Haemotoxylin eosin.
Aspergillus flavus Aspergillus flavus colony.
Aspergillus flavus Aspergillus flavus colony.

Colonies on CYA 60-70 mm diam, plane, sparse to moderately dense, velutinous in marginal areas at least, often floccose centrally, sometimes deeply so; mycelium only conspicuous in floccose areas, white; conidial heads usually borne uniformly over the whole colony, but sparse or absent in areas of floccose growth or sclerotial production, characteristically Greyish Green to Olive Yellow (1-2B-E5-7), but sometimes pure Yellow (2-3A7-8), becoming greenish in age; sclerotia produced by about 50% of isolates, at first white, becoming deep reddish brown, density varying from inconspicuous to dominating colony appearance and almost entirely suppressing conidial production; exudate sometimes produced, clear, or reddish brown near sclerotia; reverse uncoloured or brown to reddish brown beneath sclerotia. Colonies on MEA 50-70 mm diam, similar to those on CYA although usually less dense. Colonies on G25N 25-40 mm diam, similar to those on CYA or more deeply floccose and with little conidial production, reverse pale to orange or salmon. No growth at 5°C. At 37°C, colonies usually 55-65 mm diam, similar to those on CYA at 25°C, but more velutinous, with olive conidia, and sometimes with more abundant sclerotia.

Sclerotia produced by some isolates, at first white, rapidly becoming hard and reddish brown to black, spherical, usually 400- 800 µm diam. Teleomorph not known. Conidiophores borne from subsurface or surface hyphae, stipes 400 µm to 1 mm or more long, colourless or pale brown, rough walled; vesicles spherical, 20-45 µm diam, fertile over three quarters of the surface, typically bearing both metulae and phialides, but in some isolates a proportion or even a majority of heads with phialides alone; metulae and phialides of similar size, 7-10 µm long; conidia spherical to subspheroidal, usually 3.5-5.0 µm diam, with relatively thin walls, finely roughened or, rarely, smooth.

Distinctive features

Aspergillus flavus is distinguished by rapid growth at both 25°C and 37°C, and a bright yellow green (or less commonly yellow) conidial colour. A. flavus produces conidia which are rather variable in shape and size, have relatively thin walls, and range from smooth to moderately rough, the majority being finely rough.

Aspergillus flavus Conidial head, 1000x light microscopy, stained with lacto-phenol cotton blue.
Aspergillus flavus Conidial head, 1000x light microscopy, stained with lacto-phenol cotton blue.

Colonies on CYA 60-70 mm diam, plane, sparse to moderately dense, velutinous in marginal areas at least, often floccose centrally, sometimes deeply so; mycelium only conspicuous in floccose areas, white; conidial heads usually borne uniformly over the whole colony, but sparse or absent in areas of floccose growth or sclerotial production, characteristically Greyish Green to Olive Yellow (1-2B-E5-7), but sometimes pure Yellow (2-3A7-8), becoming greenish in age; sclerotia produced by about 50% of isolates, at first white, becoming deep reddish brown, density varying from inconspicuous to dominating colony appearance and almost entirely suppressing conidial production; exudate sometimes produced, clear, or reddish brown near sclerotia; reverse uncoloured or brown to reddish brown beneath sclerotia. Colonies on MEA 50-70 mm diam, similar to those on CYA although usually less dense. Colonies on G25N 25-40 mm diam, similar to those on CYA or more deeply floccose and with little conidial production, reverse pale to orange or salmon. No growth at 5°C. At 37°C, colonies usually 55-65 mm diam, similar to those on CYA at 25°C, but more velutinous, with olive conidia, and sometimes with more abundant sclerotia.

Sclerotia produced by some isolates, at first white, rapidly becoming hard and reddish brown to black, spherical, usually 400- 800 µm diam. Teleomorph not known. Conidiophores borne from subsurface or surface hyphae, stipes 400 µm to 1 mm or more long, colourless or pale brown, rough walled; vesicles spherical, 20-45 µm diam, fertile over three quarters of the surface, typically bearing both metulae and phialides, but in some isolates a proportion or even a majority of heads with phialides alone; metulae and phialides of similar size, 7-10 µm long; conidia spherical to subspheroidal, usually 3.5-5.0 µm diam, with relatively thin walls, finely roughened or, rarely, smooth.

Distinctive features

Aspergillus flavus is distinguished by rapid growth at both 25°C and 37°C, and a bright yellow green (or less commonly yellow) conidial colour. A. flavus produces conidia which are rather variable in shape and size, have relatively thin walls, and range from smooth to moderately rough, the majority being finely rough.

Pages