Medical and Patient Educational videos

Highlighted talk:

Full presentation Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis, by Prof David Denning. Presented in March 2016.

Also see our Aspergillus & Aspergillosis Youtube Channel

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Molecular tools for nucleic acid and protein detection

Dr.

Improved fungal assays in our lifetime? New monoclonal antibodies

Dr.

A 10 year review of IFD management in Haemato-Oncology Diagnostics in clinical practice: 10 years on, have we moved forward?

Prof. Rosemary Barnes, Cardiff University School of Medicine    

Fungal Update Meeting 2015 & 2016

An annual clinical forum intended to provide updates on a wide range of fungal infection topics

http://fungalupdate.org/

Global impact of fungal disease and the challenges ahead

Prof. David Denning, Professor of Infectious Diseases in Global Health, The University of Manchester

Top papers and TIMM highlights - 2015

Dr. Rohini Manuel, Consultant Clinical Microbiologist, Public Health England, London

National quality assurance for fungal diagnostics

Shila Seaton, Bacteriology Scheme Manager, UK NEQAS for Microbiology, Public Health England

Updating the EORTC/MSG criteria for invasive fungal diseases - inclusion of PCR

Dr. P. Lewis White, Principal Clinical Scientist, Public Health Wales Microbiology, Cardiff

Beyond the halo sign – towards pathogen identification using CT-PET

Prof. Dr. Clemens Decristoforo, Radiopharmacist, Univ.Klinik f.Nuklearmedizin, Innsbruck, Austria

The Austrian experience: PCR, GM, BDG, LFD, CT and BAL (plus the kitchen sink!)

Dr. Martin Hoenigl, Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Austria

Fungal headaches from Barts Health – get your thinking caps on!

Dr. Jonathan Lambourne, Consultant in Infectious Diseases, Barts Health NHS Trust, London

Case Presentations: Is there Candida in the fluid? A cluster of cases in solid organ recipients

Dr. Inês Ushiro-Lumb, Lead Clinical Microbiologist for Organ Donation and Transplantation, NHS Blood and Transplant, London

From bench to drug discovery - fungal pathogenicity and target identification for A. fumigatus

Dr. Mike Bromley, Lecturer, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, University of Manchester

Gene profiling for new biomarkers for Aspergillus

Dr. Sharleen Braham, Clinical Scientist, King’s College Hospital, London

Nutritional immunity and fungal pathogenesis

Dr. Duncan Wilson, Research Fellow, Aberdeen Fungal Group, University of Aberdeen

Antifungal stewardship in haemato-oncology

Prof. Patricia Muñoz, Division of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain

Antifungal stewardship in ICU

Dr. Eavan Muldoon, Consultant in Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of South Manchester

Fungal infections in paediatrics – the National Antifungal Stewardship Programme in Paediatrics

Prof. Adilia Warris, Principal Investigator, Aberdeen Fungal Group, University of Aberdeen    

Royal Society Exhibition: Killer fungus

Created by Patrick Hickey for the “Killer Fungus” exhibit at the 2016 Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition

Dealing with diversity – immune responses to fungi

Fungi are everywhere. They’re present in the air, in our food, some even live inside our bodies. But most of us rarely think about diseases caused by fungi. This is because our defences do a really good job in keeping them in check.

The role of mitochondria in fungal pathogenesis

Candida albicans is one of the fungal species most commonly causing life threatening infections in vulnerable patients. Our group is studying the mitochondria in Candida albicans cells.

Human lung cells: a defence against fungal spores

Every day we inhale hundreds of fungal spores but these in healthy individuals are efficiently eliminated by specialist immune cells called phagocytes which engulf and kill them. However, some human illnesses interfere with this defence mechanism,

The heat is on; cooling down the response to Aspergillus

My research is focused on infections caused by Aspergillus, which is present in the environment all around us.

Our microscopic army against fungal killers

Cryptococcus, like many fungi, produces spores that are found in the air that we breathe. These spores will be inhaled into our lungs but they do not cause any harm because of our immune defences.

The host-pathogen struggle for nutrients

We can view an infection as a battle between the human host and the microbial invader. The outcome of which decides whether the host remains healthy or succumbs to disease.

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