In Vivo Efficacy of an Alcohol-Based Hand Rub Against Bacteria, Fungi, and Viruses

SARAH EDMONDS, ROBERT MCCORMACK and KELLY BURNINGHAM

Author address: 

GOJO Industries, Inc, Akron, OH

Abstract: 

Background: Use of alcohol based hand rubs (ABHR) is well established as an effective means of hand hygiene. However, these products are typically tested in vitro or are tested in vivo using a single surrogate organism, typically Escherichia coli or Serratia marcescens . ABHR are rarely tested in vivo against clinically relevant organisms due to the high cost of such testing and the potential risk to human subjects. The object of this study was to assess the broad spectrum in vivo efficacy of an ABHR gel against clinically relevant bacteria, viruses and fungi. Methods: A 70% ethanol gel ABHR was tested according to: ASTM E2276-10 (bactericidal fingerpad method) against S. marcescens , E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus , and Staphylococcus epidermidis ; ASTM E2613-08 (fungicidal fingerpad method) against Aspergillus brasiliensis and Candida albicans ; and ASTM E2011-09 (virucidal whole hand method) against Rhinovirus, Rotavirus, Adenovirus, and Murine Norovirus. Log reductions from baseline were calculated for the test product against each organism. Results: The ABHR gel achieved a >4 log reduction against Aspergillus and all bacteria tested, and a 3.56 log reduction against Candida . Virucidal activity ranged from a 2 log reduction for Murine Norovirus to a 3.35 log reduction against Adenovirus. Conclusion: This was the first study to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of an ABHR against a large set of diverse microorganisms. The data demonstrate that an ABHR can be highly effective against a broad spectrum of bacteria, fungi and viruses when tested by in vivo methods. Moving forward, more in vivo data is needed because in vitro data is not always predictive of in vivo results or clinical performance.
2012

abstract No: 

1005

Full conference title: 

ID Week 2012
    • IDWeek 2012