Onychomycosis due to non dermatophytic mould in Tehran

J. Hashemi1, H. Hosseinjani2, N. Nasrollahi3

Author address: 

1TUMS, TEHRAN, Iran 2Pharmaco collage, MASHHAD, Iran 3Islamic Azad University/tonekabon branch, TONEKABON, Iran. Correspondence: PO Box: 14155-6446, Dep. Of Mycology, school Of Public Health Research, Tehran University of Medical sciences, Tehran,

Abstract: 

Objectives: Onychomycosis, a common nail disorder results from invasion of the nail plate by a dermatophytes, yeasts or mould species that these fungi give rise to some diverse clinical presentations. The purpose of present study was to isolate and determine the causative fungi of onychomycosis in the population in Tehran, Iran. METHODS: Totally nail materials of 504 patients with prediagnosis of onychomycosis during 2005, were examined both with direct microscopy observation of fungal elements in KOH preparations and culture to identify the causative agent. All samples were inoculated on (1) Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA, Merk) (2) SDA with 5% chloramphenicol and cycloheximide in dublicate for dermatophyte and (3) SDA with 5% chloramphenicol triplicate for mould isolation. RESULTS: Out of a total of 504 cases examined, 216 (42.8%), were mycologically proven cases of onychomycosis (144 finger nails, 72 toe nails). Among the positive results, dermatophytes were diagnosed in 46 (21.3%), yeasts in 129 (59.7%) and non dermatophytic mould in 41(19%). Trichophyton mentagrophytes was the most common causative agent (n=22), followed by Trichophyton rubrum (n=13), Candida albicans (n=42), C. spp. (n=56) and Aspergillus spp. (n=21) CONCLUSIONS: near the half of clinical suspected fungal nail infections is onychomycosis and yeast is responsible for most of the infections in Iran. BACKGROUND: Onychomycosis, a common nail disorder results from invasion of the nail plate by a dermatophytes, yeasts or mould species. These fungi give rise to diverse clinical presentations. The present study aimed to isolate the causative pathogens and to determine the various clinical patterns of onychomycosis in the population in Tehran, Iran. METHODS: Totally nail materials of 504 patients with prediagnosis of onychomycosis during 2005, were examined both with direct microscopy observation of fungal elements in KOH preparations and culture to identify the causative agent. All samples were inoculated on (1) Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA, Merk) (2) SDA with 5% chloramphenicol and cycloheximide in dublicate for dermatophyte and(3) SDA with 5% chloramphenicol triplicate for mold isolation. RESULTS: Out of a total of 504 cases examined, 216 (42.8%), were mycologically proven cases of onychomycosis (144 fingers, 72 toenails). Among the positive results, dermatophytes were diagnosed in 46 (21.3%), yeasts in 129 (59.7%) and non dermatophytic mold in 41(19%). Trichophyton mentagrophytes was the most common causative agent (n=22), followed by Trichophyton rubrum (n=13), Candida albicans (n=42), C. spp. (n=56) and Aspergillus spp. (n=21) CONCLUSIONS: near the half of clinical suspected fungal nail infections is onychomycosis and yeast is responsible for most of the infections in Iran.
2009

abstract No: 

P301

Full conference title: 

4th Trends in Medical Mycology
    • TIMM 4th (2012)