A Hospital Outbreak of Candida parapsilosis Bloodstream Infections - Mississippi, 2001.

T.A. CLARK1, J. MORGAN1, M. BRANDT1, T. LOTT1, S. SLAVINSKI2, S. TAYLOR2, H. FLOWERS2, S. FRIDKIN1, R. HAJJEH1

Author address: 

1 CDC, Atlanta, GA, 2 MS State DOH, Jackson, MS

Abstract: 

Background: Candida parapsilosis (Cp) commonly causes central venous catheter (CVC)-associated bloodstream infection (BSI). During 2001, a community hospital in Mississippi (Hospital A) observed an increase in bloodstream and CVC tip Cp isolates. To determine the extent of the outbreak, identify risk factors for infection, and recommend control measures, we conducted a case-control study and an environmental investigation. Methods: We defined confirmed and possible cases by the isolation of Cp from the bloodstream or CVC tip, respectively, from a Hospital A inpatient during the outbreak period (April 1 through October 31, 2001). We matched two controls per case by age group and length of hospitalization prior to culture. We observed health care worker (HCW) hand hygiene (HH) practices, and cultured HCW hands. We performed antifungal susceptibility testing and molecular typing of Cp isolates using electrophoretic karyotyping and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. Results: We identified 15 confirmed and 7 possible cases (median age 58 years; 55% white; 55% male; 41% died). Increased risk of infection among confirmed cases was associated with: higher APACHE II scores, mechanical ventilation, multiple CVCs, and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) (p
2002

abstract No: 

M-880

Full conference title: 

42nd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
    • ICAAC 42nd