The future of antifungal therapy

Graybill, J. R.

Author address: 

Graybill, JR, UNIV TEXAS,CTR HLTH SCI,DEPT MED,DIV INFECT DIS,7703 FLOYD CURL DR,SAN ANTONIO,TX 78284

Abstract: 

In the late 1970s the options for systemic antifungal therapy doubled with the addition of intravenous miconazole and oral ketoconazole to the two previously available agents, amphotericin B and flucytosine. The 1980s ushered in the next generation of triazole antifungals, fluconazole and itraconazole. These are the present-day mainstays of treatment for some of the most serious systemic fungal infections. However, the increase in the numbers and types of fungal pathogens, and especially the emergence of azole-resistant fungi, have prompted a continuing search for new therapeutic options. This search has yielded more-potent triazole antifungals, new vehicles for both polyenes and triazoles, and entirely new classes of agents such as the echinocandin derivatives; in addition, it has prompted the evaluation of new combinations of present-day antifungals and exploration of the use of immunomodulators for treatment of fungal infections. Rapid developments in molecular mycology are permitting a concentrated search for more targets for antifungals. We are entering a new era of antifungal therapy in which we will continue to be challenged by systemic fungal diseases but will have greatly expanded options for treatment.
1995

abstract No: 

NULL

Full conference title: 

Focus on Fungal Infections 5 Meeting
    • Focus on Fungal Infection 5 (1995)