Factors Associated with Funguria Treatment in Hospitalized Patients: Insights Into Physicians’ Antibiotic Prescribing Behavior When Evidence of Infection May Be Lacking

LOREN G. MILLER, MD, MPH1, HONG ZHANG, BS2, JASON CRONIN, MD1, JEANNETTE LEE, PhD3, WILLIAM E. DISMUKES, MD3, CAROL A. KAUFFMAN, MD4;

Author address: 

-University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, CA, 2California State Univ., Dominguez Hills, CA, 3Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, 4Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Abstract: 

Background: There are data suggesting that unnecessary antibiotic use is common among hospitalized patients. However, reasons that physicians may overprescribe antibiotics remain poorly understood. Methods: We evaluated data from the Mycoses Study Group funguria investigation, a prospective observational study from 10 U.S. medical centers of hospitalized patients with a urine culture positive for yeast (n=860). We excluded patients enrolled in a funguria treatment clinical trial (n=75). We modeled two outcomes: 1) treatment with systemic or local antifungals and 2) urinary catheter removal (or change). We compared outcomes with hypothesized factors associated with treatment in bivariate and multivariate models. Because in most cases treatment of funguria remains controversial, our models corrected for important clinical covariates. Results: Among 785 patients, 223 were prescribed antifungals and 260 had catheters removed. Factors associated with antifungal treatment at the bivariate level (p
2004

abstract No: 

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Full conference title: 

42nd Annual Meeting Infectious Diseases Society of America
    • Infectious Diseases Society of America 42nd