Efficacy of Allicin, the Reactive Molecule of Garlic, in Inhibiting aspergillus spp. In Vitro, and in a Murine Model of Disseminated Aspergillosis.

N. OSHEROV, E. SHEMESH, D. MIRELMAN, T. MIRON, A. RABINKOV, M. WILCHEK, Y. SHADKHAN

Author address: 

Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

Abstract: 

Background: Allicin is the biologically active compound responsible for the antimicrobial activities of freshly crushed garlic cloves. It reacts with thiol groups of various enzymes. Mammalian cells are at least 10-fold less sensitive to allicin because, unlike microbes they contain glutathione that reactivates allicin-thiolated essential enzymes. Methods: Pure allicin was prepared by reacting synthetic alliin with a stabilized preparation of the garlic enzyme alliinase. We tested the in vitro efficacy of pure allicin against 31 clinical isolates of aspergillus species using a microdilution broth method and following the NCCLS guidelines (Document M-38P). Subsequently, we tested the in vivo efficacy of allicin in immunocompetent mice infected (IV) with aspergillus fumigatus conidia. Allicin (5mg/kg of body weight) was administered IV once daily for 5 days postinfection or per os (P/O) for 5 days preinfection and 10 days postinfection. Results: The MICs and MFCs for allicin were between 2-16 µg/ml and 8-32 µg/ml respectively, indicating that allicin in its pure form is a highly effective and potent fungicide in vitro. No ill effects were observed in allicin-treated uninfected mice. Allicin treatment significantly prolonged survival of infected mice (P
2003

abstract No: 

M-960

Full conference title: 

43rd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents
    • ICAAC 43rd