EARLY ONSET CANDIDA INFECTION IN THE NEONATE: RISKS AND TRENDS

Rosenberg M1, Garb J2, Fisher D1

Author address: 

1Baystate Medical Center Children’s Hospital 2Baystate Medical Center Department of Surgery, Tufts University School of Medicine, Springfield, USA

Abstract: 

Background: Candida infection is an increasingly common complication in the NICU. Several factors place this population at risk, including: antibiotics, intubation, and central venous lines. Maternal factors such as prolonged rupture of membranes, vaginal infection, and prenatal antibiotics increase the risk of early disease. Objective: To describe factors that place neonates at risk for Candida infection or colonization in the first week of life (early onset disease/EOD) and to compare this group with those who acquire Candida infection after one week (late onset disease/LOD). Trends in Candida sepsis were also studied. Design/Methods: A retrospective chart review from 1992-2003 was done at a tertiary care center. NICU files, infectious disease consult forms, and medical records search with ICD-9 codes identified infants. Any neonate with a Candida isolate from a sterile or nonsterile body site (if systemic treatment was given) was included . A univariate comparison of the EOD and LOD groups was conducted (Chisquare, student t-test). The observed frequency of Candida infection by year was analyzed by chi square test of linear trend (Cochran). Results: In the EOD group (n=21), 33% had positive blood cultures compared to 78% in the LOD (n=51, p
2004

abstract No: 

none

Full conference title: 

14th Annual Focus on Fungal Infections
    • FFI 2004 (14th)