Aspergillus Surveillance in a Tertiary-care Pediatric Hospital: A 12-year experience

AMANDA ADLER, JULIE SMITH, and DANIELLE ZERR

Author address: 

Seattle Children's Hospital Research Institute, Seattle, WA

Abstract: 

Background: Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Transmission occurs through inhalation of airborne spores. Although high levels of spores are associated with hospitalacquired disease, specific levels have not been associated with quantifiable infection risk. While a few reports of air sampling surveillance exist in adult settings, no long-term surveillance reports exist in pediatrics. Methods: As part of our standard infection prevention practices, a total of 3,240 air samples were collected using a SAS Super 100 Microbial Air Sample (Biosciences International) from March 2000-March 2012. The air sampler was loaded with Sabouraud agar plates for fungal isolation. The samples were incubated at 30°C for 5 days. Results: Overall, 2,699 samples were obtained for routine monthly sampling (including 280 outdoor samples), 477 for completion of construction projects and 64 for investigations of hospital-acquired cases or concerns for environmental mold. Among outdoor samples, 269 (96%) were positive for fungi versus 1,407 (48%) of the indoor samples (p
2012

abstract No: 

1169

Full conference title: 

ID Week 2012
    • IDWeek 2012