Mold and Outdoor Aeroallergen IgE Sensitizations are Associated with Atopic Dermatitis Children who are Hospitalized for Asthma

Mona Liu1 , and Peck Y. Ong, MD FAAAAI2

Author address: 

1 UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 2 Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles/USC, Los Angeles, CA.

Abstract: 

RATIONALE: We have previously shown that atopic dermatitis (AD) children who are hospitalized for asthma had a more severe hospital course than those without AD. As aeroallergens are important triggers for AD, we evaluate if AD children who are hospitalized for asthma are associated with specific environmental IgE sensitizations.

METHODS: This is a prospective study in which we recruited 48 children who were hospitalized for asthma exacerbation. Twenty of these children had AD while 28 did not. All subjects had serum testing for Southern California indoor and outdoor aeroallergen panel. Specific IgE > 0.35 kU/ L was considered positive. Logistic regression was used to analyze any association between IgE sensitizations and presence of AD.

RESULTS: Our current study confirmed a significant association between subjects with AD and a longer hospital length of stay using logistic regression (OR 1.5; p 5 0.04). There was a significant association between AD subjects and IgE sensitization to molds (A. fumigatus, A. tenuis, C. herbarum and P. notatum) and pollens (trees, grasses and weeds)(OR > 3; p < 0.05). There was no significant association between AD subjects and sensitization to indoor allergens including cat, dog, D. pteronyssinus and cockroach (p > 0.06), except to D. farinae (OR 5 4; p 5 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS: AD children who are hospitalized for asthma are mainly associated with IgE sensitizations to molds and outdoor aeroallergens. Further studies are needed to investigate how these aeroallergens contribute to a more severe hospital course in these children.

2019

abstract No: 

319

Full conference title: 

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 2019
    • AAAAI 2019