Microbiology of combat-related extremity wounds: Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study.

Author: 

Mende K, Stewart L, Shaikh F, Bradley W, Lu D, Krauss MR, Greenberg L, Yu Q, Blyth DM, Whitman TJ, Petfield JL, Tribble DR.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2019 Jun;94(2):173-179.

Abstract: 

We present extremity wound microbiology data from 250 combat casualties (2009-2012). Confirmed extremity wound infections (EWIs) were based on clinical and laboratory findings. Suspected EWIs had isolation of organisms from wound cultures with associated signs/symptoms not meeting clinical diagnostic criteria. Colonized wounds had organisms isolated without any infection suspicion. A total of 335 confirmed EWIs (131 monomicrobial and 204 polymicrobial) were assessed. Gram-negative bacteria were predominant (57% and 86% of monomicrobial and polymicrobial infections, respectively). In polymicrobial infections, 61% grew only bacteria, while 30% isolated bacteria and mold. Multidrug resistance was observed in 32% of isolates from first monomicrobial EWIs ±3 days of diagnosis, while it was 44% of isolates from polymicrobial EWIs. Approximately 96% and 52% of the suspected and colonized wounds, respectively, shared ≥1 organism in common with the confirmed EWI on the same patient. Understanding of combat-related EWIs can lead to improvements in combat casualty care.